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20130113
20130121
STATION
CSPAN 9
CNBC 1
CNNW 1
CSPAN2 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
that is we create a regulatory environment, tax environment, and competitive regime here in this country that actually allows our businesses and workers to win in that global wheat competitive game at the moment. we have some extraordinary assets in this country. we have a highly educated and motivated work force that in many respects outperforms, not out educated about from a point of view workers in virtually every effort country. we have the most efficient capital markets in the world. our companies have the lowest cost of capital of any companies anywhere around the globe. we have a spirit of entrepreneurship and innovation and capitalist system and commitment to a capitalist system that is the envy of virtually every other country in the world, and we also have increasingly as elude it to in the earlier panel have always had a very strong natural resources, but with shale oil and gas and the incredible strength of our agricultural industry we have a great natural resources as well so there's a lot to be bullish about in this country in terms of our economic opportunities, but this f
? that is a very rich interest level, in our current interest- rate environment. you have to wonder if the bank is not just holding on to your loan to maintain a high level of interest? but i wonder if this may be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstance to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all of the bad loans that they made during the real-estate mania. >> one other issue that was brought up was the issue of debt-income ratio, and this is something richard spoke about and what he would do with the qualified loans. american hero joe says, what did he mean by 20% of the grossly month in come? explain this issue for us? >> this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan issue, that described a little bit ago. we don't want people taking on loans they cannot afford to repay, that leads us to problems. what they have decided is that 43% is the outside level, if your mortgage debt, plus or other debt, with car loans or consumer debt or credit cards, -- if your other obliga
to have buzz-in doors, that infrastructure is part of creating safe secure learning environments. and then being able to really look at the personnel that you have in your school that helps support students. from training for teachers in the classroom to the other adults who are in the classroom because there are so many adults there besides the classrooms the classroom teachers the school bus drivers, the janitors, you know, the shooting at the high school in california, it was a teacher and a campus supervisor who really talked down that student and prevented lots of further violence. that kind of training is critically important. i mean, look at in this time of crisis when states have slashed budgets and taken so many resources out of schools, some of those resources are school counsellors, school psychologists, social workers, and now, where you might have had a school counselor per school, maybe dealing with two or 300, some of the ratios now for school psychologists, for example, is one to 1,000. you can't possibly provide the kind of support
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
. one of the leaders of this market, banks. financials. can that last in this environment? >> i mean look banks have a long way that they fell and they've had a long pathway back to something circa 2006-2007. they sri lankan as a percentage of market gap in the s&p. they are no longer dominant. that's all for the best. we have a much more diversified market. we should. i wouldn't say that the banks need to lead this matter. they've done very well. >> who is going to lead the market? >> i think you'll have a market without leadership but that doesn't mean a market that doesn't go up. you have multiple sectors of strength. technology. be inning to see how amazon does. you have a global economy growing modestly. >> are you worry about apple? >> as a company? no. am i concerned about apple as a stock at 500, i will be glad if we talked less about apple. it's one company amongst many. anybody in silicon valley has to be worried about the fact that their franchise is of extremely short duration. >> boeing. this boeing story is creeping up, getting worse on a daily basis. would you get rid
for silence and the environment host as forum on the disasters and environment. after remarks by fema director craig fugate, the lessons will focus on hurricane katrina, the ongoing drought and earthquake in japan on c-span 3 at 8:30 eastern. on c-span 2 at 9:00 a.m. eastern, a brookings institution conference on innovation and the economy. panelists in the day long event are scheduled to include the presidents and c.e.o.'s of alcoa, procter & gamble and nike. >> he had been talking about this dream he'd had. he talked about it for years, the american dream, and that it had become his dream and he had been in detroit just a few months before and he had talked about, you know, i have a dream that america will some day realize these principles and the declaration of independence. so i think he was just inspired by that moment. >> sunday on "after words" clayborn carson recalls his journey as a civil rights activist participating in the march on washington. it's part of three days of book tv this weekend, monday, featuring authors and books on the inauguration, president obama and martin luther k
and certainly in the schools as well i think we can have a much safer community and environment for our kids than we have now. >> marc klaas joining us this morning. marc the father of polly klaas and the founder of the klaas kids foundation. thanks for talking to us. we appreciate your time this morning. >> thank you so much. >> many people pointed out that it appears in the video the little girl goes so easily with her mother, her mother wears a burqa and so maybe she didn't know it was her mother. kids that age will go with an adult. their whole lives are -- their lives -- >> right. >> i picked one of my friend's kids from tae kwon do, and they didn't ask where is mom and dad, where are we going, it's one of the things you have to be so careful that what kind of adults are around and i was amazed that an adult can stroll into a school and out with a child like this. >> children don't ask, okay, because their whole lives are built around, you go to that now, you do this now, i think it's really a terrifying thing that the people didn't say to you, i don't care if he says he knows you, i ne
interest level in this environment. you have to wonder if the bank isn't holding on to your loan to maintain that high level of interest. i wonder if the might be worth your while to try to go to another bank and not refinance with the same company. it has become a much more difficult circumstances to get a mortgage because the banks are still recovering from all the bad loans that day made during the real estate mania. host: this idea of the debt to income ratio. that was something richard cordray talked-about. this is from american hero joe. explain this issue for us. guest: this goes to the heart of the ability to repay the loan. we do not want people taking on loans that they cannot afford to repay. 43% is the outside level. if your mortgage debt sure other debt -- car loans, credit cards -- exceed 43% of your growth or pre-tax income, then that is too much. that is a loan that is becoming too onerous and you might have trouble repaying. anything below 43% is acceptable as a qualified mortgage. anything above that starts to get into the territory of you are not having enough
proportionally because it was a real working-class environment which i grew up. so you didn't have mounds of food on your plate. and there were no snacks in our house. we didn't have potato chips or cookies. my mother would bake cookies once a week and then you'd have them as a treat. it was a whole different eating plan even though we were knocking back cokes all day long. >> with all due respect, i've heard this from joe, that's great that you ran all day. wonderful. that about the kids over the past 10, 20, 30 years who drank five cokes a day and didn't do that. >> is that coke's fault? that's the question. >> actually, it's part of a bigger problem just like the gun debate, okay? >> look, i have friends at coca-cola and friends at most of the soft drink companies. i think you've got to give them credit for at least putting this out there and saying obesity is an issue in america, and calories do count, and we're now talking about it as a result of them doing that. and it probably will generate some kind of a dialogue. >> i'll give them credit skeptically because i think they're covering thems
that makes it a crime. we could say after the fact -- through via social services, unsafe environment, is that really getting at the particular issue? i don't think it does. and sometimes they to be a little creative to do it. in regard to domestic violence, absolutely. and here's what we could do with that. first of all -- forgive me for saying the obvious, but nics, you know, is a wonderful thing. i'm sorry. ncic. well, they're both wonderful things. anything with a serial number goes in there, too, like a toaster, if you have one. it's not necessarily a go-to database to get where we want to get. i think you are right on. they should go in the ncis system. what we need is funding for crisis teams because a lot of times, even on guns, and often is the case, are not involved but someone needs some help, and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources that are available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we got something. now it is the mental health e.r., if you will and the officer d
. frankly we need legislation that makes it a crime. unsafe environment, those kind of things, but is that really getting at the particular issue? i don't think it does. and sometimes they have to be able to be creative to do that. in a regard to domestic violence. absolutely. here's what we could do with that. first of all, and forgive me for saying the obvious, but nix is a wonderful thing. i'm sorry, ncic. they're both wonderful things. but ncic is a wonderful thing but anything with a serial number goes in there, too like a toaster, if you have one. it's not necessarily a go-to database. i think you're right on and i think that those people should go into the nix system right away and i think that what we need is then funding for crisis teams. because a lot of times, and even when guns and often is the case are not involved but someone needs some help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources that are available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we got something. no
after the fact, social services, an unsafe environment, but that does not get at the issue. they have to be creative sometimes to do that. in regards to domestic violence, absolutely. here is what we can do. forgive me for saying the obvious, ncic is a wonderful thing. anything with a serial number goes in there, like a toaster. it is not necessarily a go to database to get what we want to get at. i think you are right on. those people should go into the next system right away. what we need is funding for crisis teams. a lot of times, someone needs help and an officer rolls up at 3:00 in the morning and they are very limited in the resources available to them. if there is funding for properly trained crisis intervention people, there we go. now we have got something. now it is the mental health e r and the offices do not have to try to be creative or drive away because there is nothing they can do. was there another question? >> i wanted to add one thing. i am not an expert in mental health. i just want to say in any comprehensive package, including appropriate funding for increased a
of law and having order and creating an environment where people can thrive because there is that order. but also understanding we live in a globe where we should be the leaders and have to interact. that's where our children's future are is being a part of this global economy. that's not something we can easily avoid, it's there. caller: i'm a city worker and right now i see that new york services for the mentally ill are being sabotaged because of the union and pensions. i just want to know why pensions are being blamed for everything. i play -- pay into my own pension. host: do you have a question or is that a statement? caller: why are pensions being blamed for the budget problems. when you pay into your -- host: thanks for the call. guest: it is just a reality. when you look at budgets and obligations there is no doubt there are some areas and some places where we've over extended our obligations. we have promised too much. you have people who have made commitments and cities and companies have made commitments that they cannot meet. that is a mathematical issue. what can we afford
in the environment in which they are in. going to be really good show tonight. >> interesting. >> 8:00 p.m. on the fox news channel. governor, thank you. coming up on the show. a big automaker recalling hundreds of thousands of cars this morning because air bags may not work. the details you need to know about next. >> tucker: manti te'o culture to blame for destroying personal relationships and should online dating be avoided all together? is it actual dating if you don't meet the person you are dating? how weird is that? a fair and balanced debate coming up. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> alisyn: we told you notre dame
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)